Thoughts on teaching crypto to journalists

Last Saturday I gave a workshop on Data Security to a small group of Bay Area journalists at Noisebridge. The workshop was a small-group test of the same material that'll be used at a larger workshop I'm helping to lead at the Committe to Project Journalism's SF conference later this month. Overall it was a great success and a really awesome experience, with 4 journalists walking away with a fully functional email encryption setup, as well as a good working knowledge on the concepts underpinning it.
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Cycling bikes is fun

I started riding my bike to work the other day, and it's very enjoyable. I've been feeling a bit sedentary in recent times, so a more active morning and evening commute is a really welcome change. I'd kinda forgotten that nice feeling you get post-exercise, and it's made me realise that I should do this more often. I find it easy to fill time with non-exercise related things, so coupling exercise with my daily commute will hopefully facilitate this becoming a habit.
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Anti-pattern checkin week #3

It's been 3 weeks since Noisebridge's Iron Blogger kicked off. While I'm happy to have kept myself to a schedule of writing at least once a week, I'm still trying to beat the anti-pattern of scrambling to write something last thing on a Sunday evening. Thankfully, I have a few things I'm working on that I'd like to write about in more detail. I'm hoping to flesh out a few post stubs to keep on hand during the coming weeks such that I'll never be short of ideas about which to write.
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Don't lock your data in proprietary products: Or, why I'm replacing my Drobo with a FreeNAS box

PSA: Don't trust your valued data to proprietary products. When they break you'll be up a proverbial creek without a paddle. The Drobo FS honeymoon period Back in 2011 I bought a Drobo FS with the intention of using it as a home backup solution. The features it offered were exactly what I was looking for: some RAID-like setup promising single parity as well as a neat ability to setup network Time Machine shares.
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Iron Blogger: It begins

I finally, this past weekend, got around to implementing the Iron Blogger group that I'd been hoping to start at Noisebridge before Christmas (better late than never). This post is actually the first of my weekly obligations. Watch this space for more blogging. Things are going well. Life is busy on many fronts. The plans that I had for Linux Fest North West and, more specifically Hackers on a Train are coming along nicely.
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Linux Fest North West - Hackers on a train

I realise it's been a while since I last posted. I've had some ideas for meaty blog posts but I've found them to be very difficult to shape into something I actually want to publish. The solution I think is to post more frequently about lighter material in a bid to get the hang of this blogging thing. Just before Christmas, Torrie took a long train ride from Jack London Square in Oakland to Cleveland on her travels to 31c3.
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2015: Resolutions

As I write this I'm back in Dublin having been at 31C3 these last few days. It was a fantastic time meeting a whole range of new interesting people, as well as getting to know better the wonderful friends that I've made this year. Running into the end of the year I was feeling a little burnt out, mostly due to fire-fighting interpersonal drama in Noisebridge. I was very much looking forward to the break from SF and the commitments I have there in the hopes that I'd be re-energised, and as it turns out it has done exactly that.
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Reading mailing list archives with Python: Noisechain Pt. 1

Inspired by the twitter account “Shit Noisebridge says” I set about recently to script together that trains a Markov chaina on the complete archive of the noisebridge-discuss@ mailing list to create a rival account “Shit noisebridge probably says”. It's not yet complete but one useful thing to have fallen out of this project already is a script that makes it easy to download mailman list arcihves in their entirety by passing the name of a list.
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